Is my business allowed to stay open for take-away and delivery services?

For businesses in England:

You should consult UK Government guidance on which venues can remain open during COVID-19 restriction. This is currently available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/880098/300320_Revised_Guidance.pdf

For businesses in Wales:

You should consult Welsh Government guidance on which venues can remain open during COVID-19 restrictions. This is currently available at: https://gov.wales/business-and-employers-coronavirus

For businesses in Scotland:

You should consult Scottish Government guidance on which venues can remain open during COVID-19 restrictions. This is currently available at: https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-business-and-social-distancing-guidance/

For businesses in Northern Ireland:

You should consult Northern Ireland Executive guidance on which venues can remain open during COVID-19 restrictions. This is currently available at: https://www.nibusinessinfo.co.uk/content/coronavirus-workplace-safety-guidance-and-priority-sector-list-published

Does my licence need to specifically state that I can sell alcohol for collection or delivery?

You must make sure that you have the correct licence to be able to sell alcohol for consumption off the premises.

For businesses in England and Wales:

To join the site you will need a DPS with a personal license, and a premises license that permits off-sales. This is the case if the premises license was marked “both” on the “sale of alcohol by retail” section of the application. Partners should check the specific conditions of their license, and check with the relevant local authority, if you are not sure what your license allows.

For businesses in Scotland:

You should check that your licence allows you to be open for physical sales of alcohol and food for consumption off the premises. You will need a personal license holder to act as the premises manager, and a premises license that permits off sales. Please note off-sales can only be made between 10am and 10pm in Scotland.

The Coronavirus (Scotland) Act 2020 made changes to allow for existing off-sales to continue to be open for physical sales of alcohol and food for consumption off the premises.

Partners should check the specific conditions of their licence, and check with the relevant Licensing Board, if you are not sure what your licence allows.

For businesses in Northern Ireland:

Holders of a public house licence are entitled to sell alcoholic drinks to the public for consumption on and off the premises. Partners should check the specific conditions of their licence if you are not sure what your licence allows.

Do I need planning permission to sell food, or does my licence need to specifically state that I can sell food for collection or delivery?

Partners should refer to planning and licensing rules and regulations to make sure that you are allowed to operate as a hot food takeaway.

Partners should also check the specific conditions of their license, and check with the relevant local authority or licensing board if relevant, if you are not sure what your license allows.

For businesses in England:

Pubs and restaurants in England can operate as hot food takeaways for a period of up to 12 months. No food or drink can be consumed on the premises and you must notify the relevant local authority when the new use begins.

For businesses in Scotland:

Where a premises licence is silent on the point, “take away” and deliveries of food are accepted as being implied into the operating plan if food is being sold on the premises. Partners should check the specific conditions of their licence, and check with the relevant Licensing Board, if you are not sure what your licence allows. Partners should also check Scottish Government guidance on selling food to take-away.

For businesses in Northern Ireland:

Partners should check guidance from the Northern Ireland Executive on whether they are allowed to sell food for delivery or collection.

What social distancing guidelines should I follow if people are collecting orders?

Partners must make sure that they are adhering to social distancing rules and guidelines.

The same social distancing rules that apply everywhere should be followed. People should stay 2 metres apart and wash their hands more often for at least 20 seconds.

Consider whether it is possible to load deliveries directly into customers cars in a “drive-thru” style to minimise queuing and the time customers spend on the premises. Also consider using additional signage to ask customers not to enter the premises if they have symptoms. Use 2 metre floor markings inside, particularly in the most crowded areas such as serving counters or entrances. If possible, provide additional pop-up handwashing stations or facilities providing soap, water and hand sanitiser.

Staggering collection times is a simple way to lower the risks of transmission. Make sure orders are ready before the customer arrives to reduce wait times and contact.

You should consult the Government guidance for food businesses on coronavirus: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-food-businesses/guidance-for-food-businesses-on-coronavirus-covid-19

What social distancing guidelines should I follow if people are collecting orders?

Government guidance on hygiene for food businesses should be followed at all times.

UK Government guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-food-businesses/guidance-for-food-businesses-on-coronavirus-covid-19

Although it is very unlikely that coronavirus is transmitted through food, as a matter of good hygiene practice anyone handling food should wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. This should be done as a matter of routine, before and after handling food, and especially after being in a public place, blowing their nose, coughing, or sneezing.

For packaging the World Health Organization (WHO) advises that the likelihood of an infected person contaminating commercial goods is low. The risk of catching the virus that causes COVID-19 from a package that has been moved, travelled, and exposed to different conditions and temperature is also very low. While food packaging is not known to present a specific risk, efforts should be made to ensure it is cleaned and handled in line with usual food safety practices. Cleaning should be in line with food hygiene practice and the environmental controls set out in the business’ HACCP. Staff should continue to follow existing risk assessments and safe systems of working.

What do I need to put in place if I am delivering orders to people’s homes?

You will need to make sure that if you are offering deliveries this is done safely and legally.

For example, you will need to make sure any vehicles being used for deliveries have appropriate insurance cover.

In order to comply with government advice on social distancing you should offer contact free deliveries. You could put deliveries on the doorstep and either ring the customer or knock and then step away from the door to a distance of 2 metres.

You should consult the Government guidance for food businesses on coronavirus: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-food-businesses/guidance-for-food-businesses-on-coronavirus-covid-19

How will I know I am delivering to people over 18?

Deliveries will need a robust age verification policy. You will need to consider the steps you can take to ensure that underage sales are not made. Photo ID should be checked, and if the delivery driver is not satisfied that they can verify the age of the person taking delivery then the delivery should not be made.

While reasonable steps will be taken to ensure that Brew2You users are over 18, age verification remains the responsibility of the Partner making the sale.